Photo by <a href="https://www.felixspeller.xyz">Felix Speller</a>
Photo by Felix Speller

Atacama desert in Chile is the source of inspiration for Chilean architect Mále Uribe Forés. In fact, the architect uses a mixture of plaster and salt coming from the desert in order to create beautiful wall tiles.

Photo by <a href="https://www.felixspeller.xyz">Felix Speller</a>
Photo by Felix Speller

The tiles are disposed in an instalment that features a 3-meter wall, composed by 1300 tiles. The tiles are geometrically shaped and create an intriguing pattern thanks to a game of light and shadows.

Photo by <a href="https://www.felixspeller.xyz">Felix Speller</a>
Photo by Felix Speller

This very disposition of the tiles comes from a pattern of architectural remains of old mining spots in the Atacama Desert.

Photo by <a href="https://www.felixspeller.xyz">Felix Speller</a>
Photo by Felix Speller

The salt instalment does not only please the eye, in fact it also has a technological appeal. The big salt wall helps reduce moisture in a room, thanks to its hydrophilic properties. Moreover, as the salt continuously crystallises taking in elements from the surrounding air, it truly becomes a living system.

Photo by <a href="https://www.felixspeller.xyz">Felix Speller</a>
Photo by Felix Speller

The Chilean architects narrative on salt speaks of a valorization of an element which is often overlooked. Mále Uribe Forés managed to create a work of art both aesthetically pleasing and functional, but above all, she created something that speaks of the story of a place.

Photo by <a href="https://www.felixspeller.xyz">Felix Speller</a>
Photo by Felix Speller

 

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